Canada Celebrates Canadian Women in Winter Sports

Canada Post of Wednesday (January 24) warmed up for the 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Games in South Korea with five new stamps honoring six barrier-breaking female role models on five new stamps.

The Women in Winter Sports stamps commemorate Sharon and Shirley Firth, from cross-country skiing; Sonja Gaudet, from wheelchair curling; Danielle Goyette, from ice hockey; Nancy Greene, from alpine skiing; and Clara Hughes, from cycling and speed skating.

The stamps were issued and the stars were honored in a ceremony at Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame in Canada Olympic Park, a hub of winter sport, in Calgary, Alberta. Shirley Firth, who passed away in 2013 at age 59, was represented by her husband, Jan Larsson, and daughters Marie and Nina Larsson.

Designed by Roy White, Matthew Clark and Jacquie Shaw of Subplot Design Inc. of Vancouver, B.C., the stamps marry candid photos with action shots of the athletes.

“Sport is a vital element of our cultural fabric. It has the power to build bridges between people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities,” said Carla Qualtrough, minister of public services and procurement. “The women of these stamps have contributed to Canada beyond the medals they’ve won or the records they’ve broken. As a group, they have been champions of accessibility, community-builders and thought leaders.”

“The women who share the podium in these stamps broke barriers, inspired generations and have contributed to our country’s national story both on and off of the ice and snow,” said Deepak Chopra, president and CEO of Canada Post. “They have been ambassadors for their sports, impressive role models and a great source of national pride.”

Here is a little more about the athletes, according to Canada Post:

Sharon and Shirley Firth transformed Inuvik into a hotbed of Nordic skiing. They competed in four Olympic Games and four World Ski Championships and dominated their sport from the late 1960s to the mid-1980s, winning 79 medals at the national championships, including 48 national titles.

Sonja Gaudet is the world’s most decorated wheelchair curler, with three Paralympic gold medals and three World Wheelchair Curling Championships. A tireless advocate for accessibility, she is an ambassador with the Rick Hansen Foundation and the Paralympic Committee.

Danielle Goyette scored more than 100 career goals and dominated women’s hockey into her 40s. She won two Olympic gold medals and a silver, as well as eight gold medals at the International Ice Hockey Federation Women’s World Championships. She was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2017.

Nancy Greene put Canada on the map in alpine skiing. She competed at Squaw Valley in 1960, Innsbruck in 1964 and Grenoble in 1968, winning gold and silver medals. Canada’s Female Athlete of the 20th Century, Greene won 17 Canadian titles, 13 World Cup victories and three U.S. Ski Championships.

Clara Hughes is the only athlete in history to win multiple medals at both the Summer and Winter Olympic Games. She made six Olympic appearances, winning six medals: one gold, one silver and four bronze – in cycling and speed skating.

From Far and Wide: Picturesque Canada Featured on Nine Stamps

Armchair travelers will likely be motivated to start planning some sort of trip this year, thanks to a set of nine upcoming stamps from Canada Post dubbed From Far and Wide.

The stamps in several denominations will be issued in various formats, mostly coils and booklets, January 15, plenty of time to plan a visit to see some of Canada’s most picturesque spots. For those who don’t want or need booklets, all nine stamps can be found on a souvenir sheet.

In addition to the From Far and Wide issues, Canada Post released the rest of its 2018 stamp calendar, which is noted at the end.

Canada Post says the From Far and Wide stamps are the first in a multiyear series. All feature current photographs of locales meant to take you on “a journey to some of the most breathtaking locations in Canada.”

The sites featured on five permanent (85-cent first-class domestic rate up to 30 grams, about 1 ounce) stamps are:

The flower-pot-shaped Hopewell Rocks, of New Brunswick; an old growth forest of Douglas fir at MacMillan Provincial Park, of British Columbia; an impressive natural rock sculpture at Parc national de I’Île-Bonventure-et-du-Rocher-Percé, of Quebec; the sand and dunes of Prince Edward Island National Park; and the brightly painted jelly bean houses of St. John’s, Newfoundland.

The four special rate stamps in the group are Pisew Falls Provincial Park in Manitoba ($1, single stamp purchase); the forested isthmus at Point Pelee National Park in Ontario ($1.20, U.S. rate); a majestic peak at Nááts’įhch’oh National Park Reserve in Northwest Territories ($1.80, oversized rate); and the northern lights at Arctic Bay in Nunavut ($2.50, international rate).

Other issues announced from Canada Post for 2018 are:

January 15: Lunar New Year – Year of the Dog.

January 24 (just before the February 9 start of Winter Olympic Games): Women in Winter Sports

February 1: Black History Month celebrates trailblazers Lincoln Alexander, the first black member of Parliament, federal cabinet minister and the 24th lieutenant governor of Ontario, and activist and humanitarian Kay Livingstone.

March: Two exquisite varieties of lotus, annual flower stamps.

April: Canadian Illustrators, featuring the work of five talented illustrators.

 April: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II graces a new commemorative, 65 years after her coronation.

 May: Native Bees of Canada; Memorial Cup (major junior hockey) 100th anniversary.

 June/July/August: Astronomy, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada’s 150th anniversary; Sharks in Canadian Waters; Weather Wonders; and Birds of Canada.

 September: Emergency Responders; and Canada Post Community Foundation.

 October: Bighorn Sheep.

 November: Christmas stamps (secular and religious).

U.S. and Canada Reveal Designs of Joint Hockey Stamps

The U.S. Postal Service and Canada Post today revealed the designs for their upcoming History of Hockey joint issue.

The stamps will be formally issued October 20 at Detroit’s Little Caesars Arena Belfor Training Center. U.S. Postmaster General and CEO Megan Brennan will be joined by Canada Post President and CEO Deepak Chopra at the ceremony.

The stamp format is tête-bêche – a joined pair of similar images in which one is upside down – and the design is strong on nostalgia. On an open pond, a player in modern equipment reflects, literally, on the past. Mirrored in the ice beneath him is a player in vintage gear. The imaginative imagery gives a visual sense of looking back through time. The paired images also depict the game’s evolution and its continuing presence in the lives of players and fans alike.

Each country uses the same basic design with just the country indicator and denomination being different. The U.S. stamps have “USA FOREVER” across their tops; the Canadian stamps have the red permanent stamp maple leaf logo in the upper left corner and “CANADA” in the upper right corner.

The Postal Service is honored to partner with Canada Post to produce The History of Hockey stamps,” said Brennan in a news release. “This sport exemplifies a wonderful tradition of competition and camaraderie between our nations, and these commemorative stamps are a special way to celebrate the game that transcends borders.

A souvenir sheet, which will be revealed during the Oct. 20 dedication ceremony, features a scene that illustrates the evolution of the sport across generations. The selvage — or area outside of the stamps on the souvenir sheet — depicts a father teaching his daughter how to play hockey on a pond.

The stamps were designed by Subplot Design Inc., for Canada Post, the artwork is intended to celebrate and reflect on the history of hockey. KC Armstrong of Toronto, Ontario, shot the photographs. Susan Gilson was the art director of the Canadian version of the stamps. William J. Gicker was the art director of the American version of the stamps.

Professional hockey is celebrating the centennial of the National Hockey League, which formally began competition in 1917. Also, hockey fans are acknowledging the 125th anniversary of the Stanley Cup, today emblematic of the annual NHL champion.

Canada Post on September 28 issued its final set of stamps in a five-year series celebrating the NHL’s 100th anniversary.

This is the sixth joint issue for Canada Post and the USPS dating back to 1959, and the first in more than a decade. It’s also their first celebrating a sport.

The first joint issue released by the two postal administrations marked the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Since then, they have jointly commemorated the United States Bicentennial (1976), the 50th anniversary of the Peace Bridge (1977), the St Lawrence Seaway’s 25th anniversary (1984) and the 400th anniversary of Samuel de Champlain’s exploration of the East Coast of North America (2006).

1972 Team Canada Hockey Team
on New Canada 150 Stamp

One of Canada’s most endearing sports teams — the 1972 Team Canada hockey team — was unveiled today as one of the 10 Canada 150 stamps that will be issued Thursday, June 1.

On September 28, 1972, millions of Canadians watched as Team Canada defeated the Soviet national hockey team in Game 8 of the Summit Series, also known as the Soviet-Canada series.

Team Canada beat the odds, overcoming an early two-goal deficit, the game was tied at 5-5. Canada scored the thrilling winning goal with just 34 seconds left in the third period. The stamp shows Canadian forward Paul Henderson celebrating his game-winning and series-clinching goal against the Soviet team.

The stamp was unveiled today in a ceremony in Winnipeg with many surviving members of the team on hand.

Several factors made this a special hockey series.

It was still the Cold War, so political tensions ran high.

Canada, once dominant in Olympic Games (Canada won the first four gold medals, plus 1948 and 1952, had been knocked off the podium with the Soviets taking three straight gold medals, 1964 through 1972.

And, this was the first competition between the Soviet national team and a Canadian team represented by professional players of the National Hockey League.

Harry Sinden chose the 35-player Team Canada, which included captains, Phil Esposito, Frank Mahovlich, Stan Mikita, and Jean Ratelle. The Soviets had a 31-player team, which included many Olympic champions.

The Soviets won three of the first five games, with Canada winning one and other being a tie. Canada won games six and seven, each by one goal, setting the stage for the thrilling Game 8, the series being tied 3-3-1. With the first four games played in Canada, the finale was staged on Soviet home ice in Moscow.

Henderson, who scored the winning goal, had just hopped onto the ice and said, “I jumped on the ice and rushed straight for their net. I had this strange feeling that I could score the winning goal.”

The team and its players received many honors over the years, including the first team to be inducted en masse into the Canada Sports Hall of Fame. Speaking at that induction in 2005, Team Canada 72 member Phil Esposito said, “A lot of people will go back and say 1972 changed the face of the game and actually I believe it did. I’m not so sure it changed for the better, by the way. But it did change the way we think and look at hockey in this country.”

Inspirational Cancer Warrior Terry Fox Honored in Canada 150 Series

Terry Fox — a determined young athlete who seemingly willed himself into the spirit of an entire nation — will be featured on a stamp in a set commemorating Canada’s sesquicentennial.

Fox, a Winnipeg native, was just 18 in March 1977 when doctors discovered he had an aggressive form of bone cancer and amputated his right leg 6 inches above the knee.

Three years later, Fox doggedly set out on a cross-country fundraiser on April 12, 1980 by dipping his artificial leg in the Atlantic Ocean in St. John’s, Newfoundland and started running westward, intent on raising money to fight cancer.

Dubbed the “Marathon of Hope,” Fox managed about 26 miles a day, but was disappointed by a lukewarm reception through the Maritimes and Quebec. But by the time he reached Ontario, word had spread about the handsome young athlete with the moppish curly hair and the skip gait who was running the equivalent of a marathon every day.

Money, cheers, and honors started pouring in. Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, hockey great Bobby Orr, and actress Maggie Smith were just a few of the many celebs who came out to meet the courageous young runner. He would receive the distinguished insignia of a Companion of the Order of Canada.

Fox bravely hobbled his way nearly to Thunder Bay, Ontario. But the Marathon of Hope sadly ended September 1, 1980 as Fox could no longer run. Cancer had spread to his lungs. Fox covered in 5,373 kilometers (3,338 miles), more than halfway across the country, in 143 days. He died June 28, 1981, a month before his 23rd birthday.

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