NPM Receives Donation from Family of Dr. George S. Brooks

The National Postal Museum announced yesterday that they have accepted a donation from the collection of the late Dr. George S. Brooks of Winchester, Kentucky. The donation consists of three volumes of postally used envelopes that Dr. Brooks assembled in honor of his son LTJG George S. Brooks, Jr. USN, who was lost at sea aboard the submarine USS Pompano off the coast of Japan during World War II.

Nimitz Cover
Envelope addressed by LTJG George S. Brooks, Jr. USN to his mother, postmarked the day before USS Pompano departed Midway Island on the patrol mission from which it never returned. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz later autographed the cover.

Pompano left Midway Island on patrol August 20, 1943 and never returned; its exact fate has never been conclusively determined. The elder Brooks channeled pride and grief for his son into collecting military mail that chronicled the hardships and sacrifices of wartime, especially the difficulties faced by military personnel and civilians in communicating from forward areas, secret locations and prisoner-of-war camps. Some of the last envelopes exchanged by Lieutenant Brooks and his parents – one marked simply “missing” – are an especially poignant part of the collection.

Mobile, Alabama Cover
The Confederate States established a post office department separate from the United States on 1 June 1861, but did not immediately issue new stamps. In the interim, the postmaster at Mobile, Alabama issued his own stamps that were in use for less than six months.

The donation was made by George S. Brooks II, accompanied by his wife, Kathy, and other members of his family. Mr. Brooks is the grandson of Dr. Brooks and the nephew of Lieutenant Brooks.

Confederate White Necktie Cover
In July 1862 the Confederate States issued a five-cent blue stamp printed from plates that were made in London and smuggled to Richmond, Virginia via a ship that ran the Union Navy blockade. Some printings of this stamp exhibit the striking “white tie” variety, caused by damage to the printing plate.

“Besides adding considerable depth to our military mail collections, the Brooks family’s gift will make it possible for the National Postal Museum to share their grandfather’s passion for collecting with others,” said Daniel Piazza, chief curator of philately.

Congratulations to Hugh V. Feldman and the Collectors Club of Chicago

The recently released book, U.S. Contract Mail Routes by Railroad, 1832-1875, received top honors in an international philatelic literature competition.

Auktionshaus Christoph Gaertner announced at MonacoPhil 2017 that the book authored by Hugh V. Feldman, of Great Britain, and published by the Collectors Club of Chicago, received first place in the fifth annual C.G. International Philatelic Promotion Award competition.

CCC club member Leonard Hartmann accepted the award, which included a €2,000 prize, on behalf of the club.

The Collectors Club of Chicago offered the following details:

This book starts with the development of the early railroads in a historical context and then focuses on the establishment, routes the cities and towns served as it relates the philatelic information. The mail contract route information is well organized and includes dates, route numbers, contract agreement and cost per mile.

The basic arrangement of the book is by states accompanied by charts, copies of detailed maps locating town and a detailed list of the stations served on the various mail contracts.

The mail contracts normally have the individual stops and dates thus one may be able to bracket in time when a specific station was in postal use.

The full-color, hardbound book runs 1,096 pages and illustrates 242 covers, 582 maps and 360 other images. A DVD included shows more than 800 covers, many which are not illustrated in the book; annual postmaster general reports; and other reports to Congress between 1817 and 1878. Also included are more than 6,000 images of the manuscript “Railroad Contracts by States.”

“The bonus disk is a boon to postal historical research,” wrote Diane DeBlois in the November issue of “The Chronicle of the U.S. Classic Postal Issues” by the U.S. Philatelic Classics Society. “Although these reports might be sourced otherwise from the internet, to have them all in one place is a gift. … So, bravo to a brave British postal historian for supplying his American counterparts with such a valuable resource.”

In late November, Feldman appeared at Chicagopex 2017 stamp show in Itasca, Illinois, where he gave a presentation based on the book and signed copies.

The competition, open to all organizations and publishers of philatelic periodicals, was founded in 2013 to recognize promotion of philatelic research and the preservation of philatelic knowledge through publication, according to outgoing APS Librarian Tara Murray, as posted in a recent APRL blog.

The Philatelic Literature Review, published by the American Philatelic Research Library, and The American Philatelist, published by the American Philatelic Society, took fourth and 10th places, respectively, in the same competition.

Compex 2017 Show, May 19–21, in Chicago Area

Compex 2017 is being held on the weekend before Memorial Day, May 19, 20, and 21, at the Forest View Educational Center, 2121 S. Goebbert Road, Arlington Heights, Illinois (Chicago area). Hours of the show are: Friday and Saturday — 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday — 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free.

Compex 2017 (Combined Philatelic Exhibition of Chicagoland) is comprised of nine Chicago area clubs holding their individual exhibits under the same roof at the same time.  Member clubs of Compex 2017 will presents a wide variety of exhibits for the viewing pleasure of all in attendance.

For the second time, Collectors Club of Chicago members have been invited to provide a special section of exhibits at Compex. At present, CCC members will have approximately 150 frames of exhibits on display.   Please be sure to view these exhibits in addition to the Compex club exhibits that will be on display. There will be something of interest for everyone to see.

This year’s theme is, “Honoring the United States Armed Forces.”  The show will have a total of approximately 180 frames of exhibits. Be sure to see the 10-frame special exhibit highlighting the show theme with a potpourri of American military mail from World War I in the Collectors Club of Chicago section.

Continue reading “Compex 2017 Show, May 19–21, in Chicago Area”

April 2017 American Philatelist Available Online

The April issue of The American Philatelist is online for APS members to view. Here are some of the highlights:

World War I by Ed Dubin and Al Kugel. April marks the 100th anniversary of the United States officially joining the Allied forces of World War I. Dozens of philatelic objects tell the tale of Americans’ involvement before the war, on the home front, on the battle lines, and after the Armistice.

Philately and Philanthropy — The American Philatelic Society and the American Philatelic Research Library present their special annual section thanking donors for their many appreciated contributions in 2016.

Stamp Classics. El Salvador’s Iconic Volcano Stamps by Joseph Iredale. A volcano appears on the first stamps of El Salvador; but which peak is it? Look closely at these four stamps and you’ll see a creative design element.
Collecting Coast to Coast. Diving in the Philatelic Backwaters by Wayne L. Youngblood. Some curious-looking cancellations were administered by devices and in ways we can figure out; some of the back stories remain a mystery.

Expertizing. Upon Further Review by Mercer Bristow. When examining stamps, the APS expertizing committee will work with clients to fill in some gaps not covered by the certificate.

Worldwide in a Nutshell. Bahawalpur by Bob Lamb. Known as a Princely State, Bahawalpur was settled in the 18th century and issued its first stamp under the authority of the Pakistani Post Office after Pakistan and India separated in 1947.

January 2017 American Philatelist Available Online

January 2017 American Philatelist
January 2017 American Philatelist.

The January issue of The American Philatelist is now online for members to view. Here are some of the highlights:

Alaskan Interrupted Mail by Steven Berlin. Uncommon and rare covers include those delayed by floods, earthquakes, ship mishaps, airplane crashes, and robberies.

Federal Use of Confederate Design Patriotic Covers of Northern Manufacture by James Milgram. A look at covers displaying Confederate designs that were manufactured and used in the North.

Superheores on Stamps by Timothy M. Bergquist. After spending decades on the pulp pages of comic books, popular superheroes have burst onto the stamp scene with a POW! BAM! and SPLASH!

1919 Texas Recruiting Flight by Don Jones. After World War I, the military found itself short of soldiers so it conducted a major recruitment campaign by dangling the new air service as a carrot.

Featured Columns
Stamp Classics by Joseph Iredale. A new column reviews some stamps from the golden era described by many as the first hundred years, 1840 to 1940. This month, a look at Thailand’s first official postage stamps and some provisionals that preceded them.

Collecting Coast to Coast: A Little Something Extra On That Cover by Wayne L. Youngblood. Messages from the Captain of the Watch, the Fiscal Director and others of interest are found in a review of private auxiliary markings that sometimes amuse or confound postal clerks, customers, and collectors.

Worldwide in a Nutshell: Antigua and Barbuda by Bob Lamb. The Caribbean islands of Antigua and Barbuda had separate philatelic histories until they were joined together as one country.