1972 Team Canada Hockey Team
on New Canada 150 Stamp

One of Canada’s most endearing sports teams — the 1972 Team Canada hockey team — was unveiled today as one of the 10 Canada 150 stamps that will be issued Thursday, June 1.

On September 28, 1972, millions of Canadians watched as Team Canada defeated the Soviet national hockey team in Game 8 of the Summit Series, also known as the Soviet-Canada series.

Team Canada beat the odds, overcoming an early two-goal deficit, the game was tied at 5-5. Canada scored the thrilling winning goal with just 34 seconds left in the third period. The stamp shows Canadian forward Paul Henderson celebrating his game-winning and series-clinching goal against the Soviet team.

The stamp was unveiled today in a ceremony in Winnipeg with many surviving members of the team on hand.

Several factors made this a special hockey series.

It was still the Cold War, so political tensions ran high.

Canada, once dominant in Olympic Games (Canada won the first four gold medals, plus 1948 and 1952, had been knocked off the podium with the Soviets taking three straight gold medals, 1964 through 1972.

And, this was the first competition between the Soviet national team and a Canadian team represented by professional players of the National Hockey League.

Harry Sinden chose the 35-player Team Canada, which included captains, Phil Esposito, Frank Mahovlich, Stan Mikita, and Jean Ratelle. The Soviets had a 31-player team, which included many Olympic champions.

The Soviets won three of the first five games, with Canada winning one and other being a tie. Canada won games six and seven, each by one goal, setting the stage for the thrilling Game 8, the series being tied 3-3-1. With the first four games played in Canada, the finale was staged on Soviet home ice in Moscow.

Henderson, who scored the winning goal, had just hopped onto the ice and said, “I jumped on the ice and rushed straight for their net. I had this strange feeling that I could score the winning goal.”

The team and its players received many honors over the years, including the first team to be inducted en masse into the Canada Sports Hall of Fame. Speaking at that induction in 2005, Team Canada 72 member Phil Esposito said, “A lot of people will go back and say 1972 changed the face of the game and actually I believe it did. I’m not so sure it changed for the better, by the way. But it did change the way we think and look at hockey in this country.”

Inspirational Cancer Warrior Terry Fox Honored in Canada 150 Series

Terry Fox — a determined young athlete who seemingly willed himself into the spirit of an entire nation — will be featured on a stamp in a set commemorating Canada’s sesquicentennial.

Fox, a Winnipeg native, was just 18 in March 1977 when doctors discovered he had an aggressive form of bone cancer and amputated his right leg 6 inches above the knee.

Three years later, Fox doggedly set out on a cross-country fundraiser on April 12, 1980 by dipping his artificial leg in the Atlantic Ocean in St. John’s, Newfoundland and started running westward, intent on raising money to fight cancer.

Dubbed the “Marathon of Hope,” Fox managed about 26 miles a day, but was disappointed by a lukewarm reception through the Maritimes and Quebec. But by the time he reached Ontario, word had spread about the handsome young athlete with the moppish curly hair and the skip gait who was running the equivalent of a marathon every day.

Money, cheers, and honors started pouring in. Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, hockey great Bobby Orr, and actress Maggie Smith were just a few of the many celebs who came out to meet the courageous young runner. He would receive the distinguished insignia of a Companion of the Order of Canada.

Fox bravely hobbled his way nearly to Thunder Bay, Ontario. But the Marathon of Hope sadly ended September 1, 1980 as Fox could no longer run. Cancer had spread to his lungs. Fox covered in 5,373 kilometers (3,338 miles), more than halfway across the country, in 143 days. He died June 28, 1981, a month before his 23rd birthday.

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Formula One Racing Roars Onto
Five New Canadian Stamps

Five legendary auto racers appear on a new set of stamps honoring the 50th anniversary of Formula One racing in Canada.

The stamps, which will be sold in booklets of 10 and a souvenir sheet of five, depict Canadian hero Gilles Villeneuve, along with Sir Jackie Stewart and Lewis Hamilton, of Great Britain, Brazil’s Ayrton Senna, and Germany’s Michael Schumacher. Three of the drivers are still living.

The stamps were formally unveiled May 15 in a ceremony in Montreal, home to Grand Prix racing in Canada, and will be officially released today, Tuesday, May 16. This year’s race is June 11. Here is the video of the unveiling event:

In addition to the driver’s profile, each stamp features a small checkered flag (indicative of the winning driver in a race), the driver’s native flag, an outline of a race car, the Formula One symbol and the year dates 1967–2017.

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Five New Canadian Stamps”

Canada Celebrates Same-Sex Marriage With Fourth Canada 150 Design

The fourth stamp in the Canada 150 set of 10, to be issued June 1, honors the country’s legalization of same-sex marriage.

On July 20, 2005, Canada became the first country outside Europe and the fourth in the world to legalize same-sex marriage nationwide after the enactment of the Civil Marriage Act. Previous countries passing a similar law were the Netherlands (2000), Belgium (2003), and Spain (2005).

The stamp shows a multicolored Pride flag. It also carries the Canada 150 branding and the combined maple leaf-and-P symbol denoting it as Permanent, a forever first-class rate stamp.

The stamp was unveiled at The 519 in Toronto and live via the Canada Post Facebook page. The 519 is a city agency and a Canadian non-profit that serves the local neighborhood and the broader lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) communities in the Toronto area.

According to its website, The 519 — a space for change — works with its neighbors and the LGBTQ community and offers such services as refugee settlement counseling, consulting, and “free, accessible and accepting space where people can gather, organize, and work toward common goals.”

The Canada 150 set of 10 will be formally issued June 1. Between now and then, six more stamp designs will be unveiled. All picture items that have occurred since the centennial in 1967.

Canada Post has previously unveiled Habitat and Expo 67, the patriation of the Constitution and creation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and Canadarm, as the first three celebratory moments of 10 in its Canada 150 program. Details are available at canadapost.ca/canada150.

Canada 150: Space-Themed Stamp
Revealed

Canada Post celebrated May the Fourth — unofficially known among a certain space-fanatic subculture as Star Wars Day — by unveiling a space-themed stamp as the third in its set of Canada 150 stamps.

Unlike the first two stamp unveilings which were held live, Canada Post unveiled the space stamp via text, photos and a video online on its Canada Post Magazine website. The new stamp, and the video featuring the students, represents Canada’s past and future in space technology.

Calm down, Wookie lovers. Star Wars is NOT on the stamp. The vignette shows the Canadarm, a piece of space equipment integral to NASA space missions that was created in Canada. The Canadarm is shown in action on the stamp in a photo shot during a space-shuttle mission. The Earth is clearly seen below.

Special guest Canadian astronaut Lieutenant Colonel Jeremy Hansen helped unveil the stamp during a filmed visit with seventh- and eighth-grade students at Glen Ames Senior Public School in Toronto. The students will represent Canada in an upcoming robotics competition in California.

In the Canada Post video, the students demonstrate their robots and Hansen talks with them about how space exploration has become an international universe in which “everyone gets along.”

Canadarm made its debut aboard the space shuttle Colombia and was used for 30 years to help move and maneuver cargo, equipment and astronauts in space. The marvel of Canadian engineering weighed less than 480 kilograms, and could lift more than 30,000 kilograms — the approximate weight of a city bus — using less power than an electric kettle, Canada Post noted.

Canada Post’s video notes that the Canadarm remains in use on the international space station as well as applications on earth.

Hansen, a former captain in the Royal Canadian Air Force, was one of two astronauts chosen following a public recruitment campaign in 2009. Hansen has not yet been to space, but he worked in space-like conditions in 2014 when he was part of the aquanaut crew in a NASA underwater project. He lived and worked for seven days in the Neemo 19 underwater laboratory.

Previously announced stamps honor Habitat at Expo 67 and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Constitution. Seven more stamps will be unveiled in special ceremonies between now and the official release date of June 1. The sesquicentennial commemoratives celebrate Canada’s 50 years since the centennial.

The Canadian Space Agency (CSA; in French, Agence Spatiale Canadienne, ASC) was created in 1989 and formally established May 10, 1990 by Royal Assent and an act of Parliament.

The creation of the agency followed space exploration with missiles and satellites during the years after World War II. After the Soviet Union and United States, Canada in 1962 became the third nation to successfully launch a satellite, Alouette 1.

Canada has an active astronaut, satellite and space technology program. Nine Canadians have participated in 17 manned missions in total: 14 NASA space shuttle missions (including one mission to Mir) and 3 Roscosmos Soyuz missions.

The first 13 flights to space for Canadians, a later 14th, were aboard NASA space shuttles. The other trips have been via Russian Soyuz spacecrafts, the last in 2012. Marc Garneau was the first Canadian in space when he traveled on the space shuttle Challenger in 1984. Garneau also was the first Canadian to return to space when he made a 1996 trip aboard Endeavour, a ship he boarded a second time in 1999.

Roberta Bondar was the second Canadian and first Canadian woman in space when she traveled on Discovery in 1992.

Chris Hadfield is the lone Canadian astronaut to visit the Mir space station when he did so in 1995.

David Saint-Jacques is due to be the next Canadian space when he travels on a Soyuz spaceship scheduled for launch in November 2018.

The headquarters of the CSA is at the John H. Chapman Space Centre in Longueuil, Quebec. Chapman was a leader in Canada’s early space program, leading to the successful launch of Alouette 1.