Maple Leaf-Shaped Stamps Honoring
Canada Sesquicentennial Will Be a First

Several notable Canadians will help unveil 10 commemorative postage stamps in the coming weeks that will mark Canada’s 150th anniversary, which is being celebrated this year.

These will be the first Canadian stamps shaped like a maple leaf, Canada Post said today in a news conference. The exact subject and designs for the stamps have not yet been revealed, but all will celebrate the most significant moments in the life of the country since it marked its centennial in 1967.

Distinguished Canadians, including a country music star, a world-renowned architect, successful business leaders, influential community activists, legendary athletes, and an astronaut will help unveil the stamp designs over the next five weeks at separate locations chosen to illustrate the story behind the achievement, event or milestone that the stamp commemorates.

The first of the 10 stamps will be unveiled on Thursday, April 27, in Montreal. The remainder will be revealed separately over five weeks, culminating with the unveiling of two stamps on June 1. On that day, all 10 Permanent domestic-rate stamps will be available in various formats — at post offices and online, via mail order or phone. Customers can also order in advance at canadapost.ca/canada150 or by phone.

Canada Post made the announcement today and offered a video message with Canada Post President and CEO Deepak Chopra, other Canada Post employees, and Steven MacKinnon, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement.

With each stamp unveiling, videos with these notable Canadians, other key participants and archival footage will tell the story of that stamp subject on the website https://www.canadapost.ca/web/en/pages/can150/default.page?ecid=murl|pdn|jr|309.

The American Philatelic Society will also post updates on this blog. Subscribe to the blog to receive notifications when new posts go up.

Canada, France Present Joint Issue for Important WWI Battle

Canada and France released a joint issue April 8 commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. The battle is considered a significant victory for the Allies in World War I and also was an important military milestone for Canada.

The joint issue features two stamps, one designed by Canada Post and the other by France’s La Poste, and honors the bond that the battle on French soil forged between the two nations.

The Canadian Permanent (first-class rate; currently 85 cents) stamps are being sold in booklets of 10. There also are separate souvenir sheets from each country featuring singles of both stamps denominated appropriately per country.

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Canada’s New Daisies Permanent Stamps

Happy Spring! Earlier this month, on March 1, Canada Post issued two new Daisies permanent-rate stamps as part of its annual spring flower stamp issue.

The stamps were produced in multiple formats, a booklet, souvenir sheet, coil, and picture postal cards.

Here’s the Canada Post press release on the stamp issue:

Canada Post “picks” Daisies for 2017
Annual flower issue timed for spring and newlyweds

OTTAWA – Once again, Canada Post will welcome spring and delight future newlyweds, gardeners and collectors with their annual spring flower issue. This year, the domestic-rate Permanent stamps will focus on two colourful varieties of daisies:

• While named after a shoreline village in Ohio, the lakeside daisy is now almost exclusively found on southern Ontario’s Bruce Peninsula and Manitoulin Island. Designated “threatened” on both federal and provincial species-at-risk lists, the perennial plant thrives in development-prone areas of exposed bedrock with scant soil.

• The usually lavender showy fleabane is found in wet meadows and open forests in higher elevation areas of British Columbia and Alberta.

For 2017, all stamp issues will include references to Canada’s sesquicentennial. For the Daisies issue, the words “Canada 150” are printed on the stamps in microtype.

Due to the popularity of this issue for wedding invitations and stationery, the 26 mm (W) X 32 mm (H) stamps are available in booklets of 10 or coils of 50 — with the coil liner printed with the lyrics of Harry Dacre’s 1892 classic song, “Daisy, Daisy.” A two-stamp Souvenir Sheet, prepaid postcards of both designs and strips of four and 10 stamps from the coil are also available. An Official First Day cover featuring both stamps is canceled in Tobermory, Ontario. The stamps were designed and illustrated by Debbie Adams, of Adams + Associates Design Consultants Inc. and printed by the Lowe-Martin Group.

Canadian Opera Takes Spotlight With Five New Stamps

Two significant Canadian-penned operas and three talented individuals who helped to put modern Canadian opera talent on the world stage are featured on five stamps to be issued February 4.

The permanent stamps that pay the first-class domestic rate (currently 85 cents) are produced in booklets of 10 and a souvenir sheet of five.

Three stamps shine the spotlight on award-winning bass baritone Gerald Finley, internationally acclaimed soprano Adrianne Pieczonka, and late director Irving Guttman, known as the “father of opera in Western Canada.”

Two stamps honor operas: the 1967 work Louis Riel, which romanticizes the life of the legendary Métis leader while Filumena is the tale of an Italian immigrant who was the only woman to be hanged in Alberta.

As with all stamp issues in 2017, these stamps have been treated with special tagging to mark Canada’s sesquicentennial. “Canada 150” will appear along the top of the stamps when they are viewed under black light.

Little Known of Interpreter Featured on Canada’s 2017 Black History Stamp

Mathieu Da Costa — a 17th-century interpreter who is thought to be the first person of African descent to arrive in Canada — is featured on this year’s Black History stamp from Canada Post.

The domestic rate self-adhesive stamps sold in booklets of 10 are being formally issued February 1 at the start of Black History Month. The official first-day cover is canceled in Tadoussac, Quebec, where historians believe Da Costa may have come ashore.

Da Costa continues to fascinate and confound scholars. Admittedly little is known about Da Costa and there is no known portrait. From the few records that remain, historians conclude he was a free man who earned a living as an interpreter for Europeans who were trading with indigenous people in the New World. Believed to be of African or even Euro-African descent, his connection to Canada came in the year 1608 — the year Samuel de Champlain founded the city of Québec — when Da Costa signed a contract to work for French fur trader, explorer and governor of Acadia, Pierre Dugua de Mons.

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