Canada Celebrates Canadian Women in Winter Sports

Canada Post of Wednesday (January 24) warmed up for the 2018 Olympic and Paralympic Games in South Korea with five new stamps honoring six barrier-breaking female role models on five new stamps.

The Women in Winter Sports stamps commemorate Sharon and Shirley Firth, from cross-country skiing; Sonja Gaudet, from wheelchair curling; Danielle Goyette, from ice hockey; Nancy Greene, from alpine skiing; and Clara Hughes, from cycling and speed skating.

The stamps were issued and the stars were honored in a ceremony at Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame in Canada Olympic Park, a hub of winter sport, in Calgary, Alberta. Shirley Firth, who passed away in 2013 at age 59, was represented by her husband, Jan Larsson, and daughters Marie and Nina Larsson.

Designed by Roy White, Matthew Clark and Jacquie Shaw of Subplot Design Inc. of Vancouver, B.C., the stamps marry candid photos with action shots of the athletes.

“Sport is a vital element of our cultural fabric. It has the power to build bridges between people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities,” said Carla Qualtrough, minister of public services and procurement. “The women of these stamps have contributed to Canada beyond the medals they’ve won or the records they’ve broken. As a group, they have been champions of accessibility, community-builders and thought leaders.”

“The women who share the podium in these stamps broke barriers, inspired generations and have contributed to our country’s national story both on and off of the ice and snow,” said Deepak Chopra, president and CEO of Canada Post. “They have been ambassadors for their sports, impressive role models and a great source of national pride.”

Here is a little more about the athletes, according to Canada Post:

Sharon and Shirley Firth transformed Inuvik into a hotbed of Nordic skiing. They competed in four Olympic Games and four World Ski Championships and dominated their sport from the late 1960s to the mid-1980s, winning 79 medals at the national championships, including 48 national titles.

Sonja Gaudet is the world’s most decorated wheelchair curler, with three Paralympic gold medals and three World Wheelchair Curling Championships. A tireless advocate for accessibility, she is an ambassador with the Rick Hansen Foundation and the Paralympic Committee.

Danielle Goyette scored more than 100 career goals and dominated women’s hockey into her 40s. She won two Olympic gold medals and a silver, as well as eight gold medals at the International Ice Hockey Federation Women’s World Championships. She was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2017.

Nancy Greene put Canada on the map in alpine skiing. She competed at Squaw Valley in 1960, Innsbruck in 1964 and Grenoble in 1968, winning gold and silver medals. Canada’s Female Athlete of the 20th Century, Greene won 17 Canadian titles, 13 World Cup victories and three U.S. Ski Championships.

Clara Hughes is the only athlete in history to win multiple medals at both the Summer and Winter Olympic Games. She made six Olympic appearances, winning six medals: one gold, one silver and four bronze – in cycling and speed skating.

NPM Receives Donation from Family of Dr. George S. Brooks

The National Postal Museum announced yesterday that they have accepted a donation from the collection of the late Dr. George S. Brooks of Winchester, Kentucky. The donation consists of three volumes of postally used envelopes that Dr. Brooks assembled in honor of his son LTJG George S. Brooks, Jr. USN, who was lost at sea aboard the submarine USS Pompano off the coast of Japan during World War II.

Nimitz Cover
Envelope addressed by LTJG George S. Brooks, Jr. USN to his mother, postmarked the day before USS Pompano departed Midway Island on the patrol mission from which it never returned. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz later autographed the cover.

Pompano left Midway Island on patrol August 20, 1943 and never returned; its exact fate has never been conclusively determined. The elder Brooks channeled pride and grief for his son into collecting military mail that chronicled the hardships and sacrifices of wartime, especially the difficulties faced by military personnel and civilians in communicating from forward areas, secret locations and prisoner-of-war camps. Some of the last envelopes exchanged by Lieutenant Brooks and his parents – one marked simply “missing” – are an especially poignant part of the collection.

Mobile, Alabama Cover
The Confederate States established a post office department separate from the United States on 1 June 1861, but did not immediately issue new stamps. In the interim, the postmaster at Mobile, Alabama issued his own stamps that were in use for less than six months.

The donation was made by George S. Brooks II, accompanied by his wife, Kathy, and other members of his family. Mr. Brooks is the grandson of Dr. Brooks and the nephew of Lieutenant Brooks.

Confederate White Necktie Cover
In July 1862 the Confederate States issued a five-cent blue stamp printed from plates that were made in London and smuggled to Richmond, Virginia via a ship that ran the Union Navy blockade. Some printings of this stamp exhibit the striking “white tie” variety, caused by damage to the printing plate.

“Besides adding considerable depth to our military mail collections, the Brooks family’s gift will make it possible for the National Postal Museum to share their grandfather’s passion for collecting with others,” said Daniel Piazza, chief curator of philately.

Love Flourishes on New U.S. Forever Stamp

The U.S. Postal Service today celebrated love of all kinds with the dedication of the Love Flourishes forever stamp during a first-day-of-issue ceremony at the Creativation conference held at the Phoenix, Arizona Convention Center. The conference, sponsored by the Association For Creative Industries, is a trade show for all aspects of the arts-and-crafts business.

Love Flourishes is the latest stamp in the popular Love series, which began 45 years ago. The stamp is being sold in panes of 20.

The stamp art features a fanciful garden of colorful flowers surrounding the word “Love” written in cursive script. Hand-painted by artist Anna Bond, the flower garden includes stylized roses, peonies and dahlias in pink, coral and yellow, with pale blue-green berries and fold fronds and leaves.

Art director Greg Breeding designed the stamp with Bond’s original art.

From Far and Wide: Picturesque Canada Featured on Nine Stamps

Armchair travelers will likely be motivated to start planning some sort of trip this year, thanks to a set of nine upcoming stamps from Canada Post dubbed From Far and Wide.

The stamps in several denominations will be issued in various formats, mostly coils and booklets, January 15, plenty of time to plan a visit to see some of Canada’s most picturesque spots. For those who don’t want or need booklets, all nine stamps can be found on a souvenir sheet.

In addition to the From Far and Wide issues, Canada Post released the rest of its 2018 stamp calendar, which is noted at the end.

Canada Post says the From Far and Wide stamps are the first in a multiyear series. All feature current photographs of locales meant to take you on “a journey to some of the most breathtaking locations in Canada.”

The sites featured on five permanent (85-cent first-class domestic rate up to 30 grams, about 1 ounce) stamps are:

The flower-pot-shaped Hopewell Rocks, of New Brunswick; an old growth forest of Douglas fir at MacMillan Provincial Park, of British Columbia; an impressive natural rock sculpture at Parc national de I’Île-Bonventure-et-du-Rocher-Percé, of Quebec; the sand and dunes of Prince Edward Island National Park; and the brightly painted jelly bean houses of St. John’s, Newfoundland.

The four special rate stamps in the group are Pisew Falls Provincial Park in Manitoba ($1, single stamp purchase); the forested isthmus at Point Pelee National Park in Ontario ($1.20, U.S. rate); a majestic peak at Nááts’įhch’oh National Park Reserve in Northwest Territories ($1.80, oversized rate); and the northern lights at Arctic Bay in Nunavut ($2.50, international rate).

Other issues announced from Canada Post for 2018 are:

January 15: Lunar New Year – Year of the Dog.

January 24 (just before the February 9 start of Winter Olympic Games): Women in Winter Sports

February 1: Black History Month celebrates trailblazers Lincoln Alexander, the first black member of Parliament, federal cabinet minister and the 24th lieutenant governor of Ontario, and activist and humanitarian Kay Livingstone.

March: Two exquisite varieties of lotus, annual flower stamps.

April: Canadian Illustrators, featuring the work of five talented illustrators.

 April: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II graces a new commemorative, 65 years after her coronation.

 May: Native Bees of Canada; Memorial Cup (major junior hockey) 100th anniversary.

 June/July/August: Astronomy, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada’s 150th anniversary; Sharks in Canadian Waters; Weather Wonders; and Birds of Canada.

 September: Emergency Responders; and Canada Post Community Foundation.

 October: Bighorn Sheep.

 November: Christmas stamps (secular and religious).

Postal Rates Due to Increase January 21

New U.S. postal rates due to begin January 21 affect most, though not all, mailing classes.

First-class domestic 1-ounce letter rate and postcard rates, which each rise by a penny to 50 cents and 35 cents, respectively, are among the rising postage rates.

Also rising will be metered first-class mail, from 46 cents to 47 cents, along with all basic shipping charges, which are rising 5 cents per rate across the board. The shipping rates include Priority Mail small flat-rate box and padded flat-rate envelope, which will rise to $7.20 and $7.25, respectively.

Two rates that are not due to rise include the additional ounce (or second ounce) first-class letter rate, which stays at 21 cents, and the international 1-ounce letter rate, which remains at $1.15.

Any appropriate forever stamps purchased at lower prices are, of course, valid for all the new rates. Forever stamps originally released to accommodate former rates will now be sold at the new price. For example, a booklet of 10 Flag stamps originally issued in 2016 and sold for $4.90 will cost $5 if purchased from the U.S. Postal Service starting January 21.

The U.S. Postal Service filed notice with the Postal Regulatory Commission on October 6 of the price changes, which still need formal approval.

The proposed prices would raise Mailing Services product prices approximately 1.9 percent, and most Shipping Services products will average a 3.9 percent price increase, the Postal Service said in a news release. While Mailing Services price increases are limited based on the Consumer Price Index, Shipping Services prices are adjusted strategically, according to market conditions and the need to maintain affordable services for customers, the USPS stated.

The following chart lists all of the main mailing rate changes, according to the USPS:

Product Current New
Letters (1 oz.) 49 cents 50 cents
Letters additional ounces 21 cents 21 cents
Letters (metered) 46 cents 47 cents
Outbound International Letters (1 oz.) $1.15 $1.15
Domestic Postcards 34 cents 35 cents

The proposed domestic Priority Mail Flat Rate Retail price changes are:

Product Current Proposed
Small Flat Rate Box $7.15 $7.20
Medium Flat Rate Box $13.60 $13.65
Large Flat Rate Box $18.85 $18.90
APO/FPO Large Flat Rate Box $17.35 $17.40
Regular Flat Rate Envelope $6.65 $6.70
Legal Flat Rate Envelope $6.95 $7.00
Padded Flat Rate Envelope $7.20 $7.25