September 2017 American Philatelist Available Online

The September issue of The American Philatelist is online for APS members to view. Here are some of the highlights:

U.N. Philately by Jeff Stage. Don’t be fooled. The United Nations may not have issued its first stamps until 111 years after the Penny Black, but there is still a world of philately to collect. An expert offers some background about U.N. collecting in anticipation of the UNEXPO17, a special World Series of Philately show, in October at the American Philatelic Center.

An Unusual Registered Item by Vincent Centonze. Why would someone send a postal card — easily viewed by anyone — as a registered item? Perhaps it was just as some assurance of delivery … or was there a blatant message the sender hoped to broadcast through the mailstream?

The Metcalf-Hunt Correspondence, 1835-1875 by Robert L. McCaughey. A collection of nearly 200 covers and letters from the 1800s help tell the story of two prominent New England families — the Metcalfs and Hunts — and their hometown of Providence, Rhode Island.

Will-Call Cards and the Traveling Salesman by Wayne Youngblood. Salesmen’s will-call cards provide an interesting collectible area that offers interesting messages, postmarks and other postal cancellations, stamp usage, and advertising, from some of the U.S. postal system’s glory years.

Turks and Caicos Islands by Noel Davenhill. We travel to the Turks and Caicos Islands, likely discovered by Columbus, wound up as a dependency of Jamaica, and finally as a British Overseas Territory. First, just the Turks Islands were occupied, but the salt industry, followed by tourism prompted growth, and philately, on the Caicos Islands as well.

Guinea-Bissau by Bob Lamb. First colonized by Portugal, this small locale on Africa’s west coast first used overprinted stamps from Cape Verde. Stamps after World War II were inscribed “Guiné” and a whole new look was created after independence in the mid-1970s.