Canada Post Visits Parliament Hill to
Unveil Second in Canada 150 Set

The Constitution Act of 1982, which essentially certified Canada’s independence from the United Kingdom, was revealed today as the second stamp in the upcoming Canada 150 set.

Government officials, including Canada’s chief justice and the head of Canada Post, unveiled the new stamp in a sunny, outdoor ceremony at 3:30 p.m. (Eastern Time) on the steps of the Parliament in Ottawa.

The 10 Canada 150 Permanent (first class) stamps — all in the shape of a maple leaf, Canada’s national symbol — will be issued June 1. Canada Post is spending the next month unveiling the stamps in ceremonies. Most of the ceremonies will be live, though a ceremony Thursday for the third stamp will be online. The first stamp unveiled last week features Habitat from Expo 67.

The Constitution Act, signed April 17, 1982, includes the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a bill of rights guaranteeing constitutional freedoms. It also includes an Aboriginal Rights clause guaranteeing rights for Native Canadians.

The signing of the act meant that the vision of the fathers of confederation was realized, said Canada Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin at Wednesday’s ceremony. “This signaled Canada’s complete independence from the United Kingdom; Canada had become of age.”

Also taking part in the ceremony were Steven MacKinnon, a member of Parliament, and Canada Post President and CEO Deepak Chopra.

The Constitution Act stamp shows a partial image of the Canadian Coat of Arms and the date “1982,” when the act was signed by Queen Elizabeth II and Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau. Interestingly, a large section of the British flag has been cut away from the arms image at upper left. Also, part of the lower right of the coat of arms has been cut away for design purposes. The cuts allow most of the Coat of Arms to be shown in the maple-leaf design.

The Canada Coat of Arms includes a traditional shield displaying the arms of England, Scotland, Ireland, and France to symbolize the nation’s founders. Underneath the four quarters, on a white field, is a sprig of three maple leaves to indicate the new nation of many peoples. Originally green, in 1957 the leaves officially became red, a common autumnal color, and thus in accord with Canada’s national colors of red and white. The crest and the shield’s  supporters — a lion and a unicorn — are similar to the royal arms of Great Britain. The motto is A Mari Usque ad Mare (“From sea to sea”).

New England Collectors Will Gather This Weekend at Philatelic Show

The 2017 Philatelic Show, sponsored by the Northeastern Federation of Stamp Clubs, will be held May 5 to May 7 at the Boxborough Regency Hotel at Interstate 405 and Route 11, in Boxborough, Massachusetts, about 25 miles northwest of Boston.

The show will feature more than 200 frames of national-level exhibits, a first-day-of-issue ceremony for a new U.S. postage stamp, more than 60 philatelic dealers, 11 societies and groups that will have meetings and/or show booths, and a show banquet.

A first-day-of-issue ceremony is set for 11 a.m. Friday for the new U.S. 3-cent coil Strawberries stamp.

Groups on hand will include the APS, American Air Mail Society, the American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors, the Canal Zone Study Group, Massachusetts Postal Research Society, Metropolitan Airpost Society, New Hampshire Postal History Society, Philatelic Society of Greater Southern Africa, Postal History Society, two chapters of the Universal Ship Cancellation Society, and the ATA Halloween on Stamps Study Group.

APS Executive Director Scott English will hold a Town Meeting 11 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

Other presentations include: Friday — “Philatelic Portal to WWII History,” with Bill Fort; Saturday — “How Postal Agreements Develop,” with Gary Loew and Jim Graue; and Chris Lazaroff on his “Journey to Attend a USPS First Day Ceremony in All 50 States”; Sunday — “Charles A. Lindbergh: The World’s First Celebrity.”

The Cotillion Room will host three post offices and agencies representing nine different stamp-issuing entities. On hand will be the U.S. Postal Service, the United Nations Postal Administration, and Nordica, which represents Aland, Denmark, Faroe Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, and Norway.

The show’s grand award exhibit winner will be eligible to compete in the exclusive Champion of Champions competition in August at StampShow in Richmond, Virginia.

Nearly three dozen New England stamp clubs, societies, and groups sponsor the show. The show opens at 10 a.m. each day and closes at 6 p.m. Friday, 5 p.m. Saturday and 3 pm. Sunday.

May 2017 American Philatelist Available Online

The May issue of The American Philatelist is online for APS members to view. Here are some of the highlights:

Champion of Champion by Robert Odenweller and John Hotchner. This August, the 50th Champion of Champions will be crowned during StampShow. Here is a look back at the roots and growth of our premier exhibiting competition, the World Series of Philately, and some of those who shaped and participated in this exhibiting event.

Fort Ticonderoga (Scott 1071) by Charles Posner. The Fort Ticonderoga stamp of 1955 was designed through a contest and led to the establishment of the Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee two years later. This stamp also was part of the PMG’s quest to improve American postage stamp design.

’Round the World in 343 Days by Chuck Fisher. A colorful cover, mailed in January 1891 in Germany finally settled back in Germany more than 11 months later. In between, it traveled to four more continents, leaving several mysteries in its wake.

Collecting Coast to Coast. When First-Day Battles Raged, by Wayne L. Youngblood. Pioneer U.S. cachetmakers fought with the U.S. Post Department over what was acceptable, or not, in their designs.

Expertizing: West Berlin Stamp in Center Ring, by Tom Horn. Identifying the different years of issue in of a continuing design of West Berlin stamps is easy: All you have to do is watch which way the clapper in the bell swings.

Worldwide in a Nutshell: Kuwait, by Bob Lamb. The first stamps of Kuwait were overprinted British stamps. The independent state, a sheikdom, started issuing its own stamps a couple years before it gained full independence in 1961.