Canada’s Native Population and Most
Recent Territory on Canada 150 Stamp

Canada’s native population and the creation of its latest, largest, and northernmost territory — Nunavut — is the seventh topic unveiled in the stamp set that celebrates Canada’s sesquicentennial.

Nunavut, a vast area of more than 785,000 square miles and populated primarily by Inuit, residents of native origin, was carved out of the Northwest Territories and formally created in 1999. It’s the only major map change since 1967 when Canada marked its centennial.

The stamp shows a partial portrait of an Inuit woman and the year “1999.” The name of the territory appears in English and native Inuit.

On June 1, Canada Post will issue a set of 10 maple leaf-shaped stamps celebrating significant achievements, places, and people from the past 50 years.

Nunavut has a population of about 37,000. The stamp was unveiled in  the territory’s capital, Iqaluit, which is in the east on Baffin Island.

The Nunavut economy includes mining; oil, gas, and mineral exploration; arts and crafts; hunting; fishing and whaling; tourism; military; and research.

Nunavut is home to the world’s northernmost permanently inhabited place, Alert, which has about 60 residents (and temporary military personnel manning a signals station) and is 508 miles from the North Pole. There are no roads directly connecting Alert to the rest of the province, though there are 530 miles of roadways within the territory.

Another Canada 150 stamp will be unveiled Wednesday and the final two on Thursday when the stamps go on sale in various formats.

Canada Post previously unveiled six previous stamps in the Canada 150 set: Expo 67/Habitat, the patriation of the Constitution and creation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canadarm (space achievements), Marriage Equality, the Trans-Canada Highway, and Terry Fox and the Marathon of Hope. Details are available at canadapost.ca/canada150.

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