Canada’s Native Population and Most
Recent Territory on Canada 150 Stamp

Canada’s native population and the creation of its latest, largest, and northernmost territory — Nunavut — is the seventh topic unveiled in the stamp set that celebrates Canada’s sesquicentennial.

Nunavut, a vast area of more than 785,000 square miles and populated primarily by Inuit, residents of native origin, was carved out of the Northwest Territories and formally created in 1999. It’s the only major map change since 1967 when Canada marked its centennial.

The stamp shows a partial portrait of an Inuit woman and the year “1999.” The name of the territory appears in English and native Inuit.

On June 1, Canada Post will issue a set of 10 maple leaf-shaped stamps celebrating significant achievements, places, and people from the past 50 years.

Nunavut has a population of about 37,000. The stamp was unveiled in  the territory’s capital, Iqaluit, which is in the east on Baffin Island.

The Nunavut economy includes mining; oil, gas, and mineral exploration; arts and crafts; hunting; fishing and whaling; tourism; military; and research.

Nunavut is home to the world’s northernmost permanently inhabited place, Alert, which has about 60 residents (and temporary military personnel manning a signals station) and is 508 miles from the North Pole. There are no roads directly connecting Alert to the rest of the province, though there are 530 miles of roadways within the territory.

Another Canada 150 stamp will be unveiled Wednesday and the final two on Thursday when the stamps go on sale in various formats.

Canada Post previously unveiled six previous stamps in the Canada 150 set: Expo 67/Habitat, the patriation of the Constitution and creation of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Canadarm (space achievements), Marriage Equality, the Trans-Canada Highway, and Terry Fox and the Marathon of Hope. Details are available at canadapost.ca/canada150.

New Book on U.S. 20th Century
Postal History — ‘Prexie Era’

The American Philatelic Society has just published Prexie Era: Postal History and Stamp Production, 1938–1962, a book highlighting 20th century U.S. postal history. Its focus is on stamp production, domestic rates and postal uses, as well as the changes of international mail routes, delays, and rates shaped by historical events of World War II.

Louis Fiset, who edits and publishes the quarterly newsletter, The Prexie Era, and has written and exhibited widely on the postal history of the period, has compiled 15 essays written by nine experts in the field. Their extensive knowledge and passion for their subject are well known to both collectors and exhibitors.

This will be the first major book on the subject since Bill Helbock’s 1988 tome, Prexie Postal History, and Roland Rustad’s The Prexies, in 1994. Rather than repeat information readily available, information in this volume focuses on a time period when the Prexies were in current use rather than on the Prexie series, exclusively. The Prexie era offers rich opportunities for collecting mail generated during times of explosive change, such as wartime crises and expanded airmail service. Stamps throughout the era contribute.

Topics included in the essays are diverse and range from Albert “Chip” Briggs’s two essays on production and uses of the 3-cent Jefferson stamp to Ralph Nafziger’s World War II censorship of first-day covers. Stephen L. Suffet concludes this volume with a provocative essay arguing why the Prexie era should end in 1962.

Prexie Era: Postal History and Stamp Production, 1938–1962 is in soft cover, 8.5 inches by 11 inches, 276 pages, with 407 full-color philatelic illustrations, seven tables, bibliography with 102 references, and index. It is available on the APS website, $39 to APS members and $43 to non-members (shipping not included.