Dorothy Height Stamp in February

The United States Dorothy Height commemorative forever stamp will be issued nationwide February 1.

Dorothy Height (Black Heritage series)
Dorothy Height (Black Heritage series)

The first-day-of-issue ceremony will take place at 11 a.m. in the Cramton Auditorium at Howard University, 2455 Sixth St., N.W., Washington, D.C. The ceremony is free and open to the public, but space is limited. To obtain free tickets, visit the Cramton Auditorium Box Office of reserve by phone at 202-806-7194 (Box Office Hours: Monday–Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.).

Here is information about the Dorothy Height commemorative stamp courtesy of the U.S. Postal Service:

Dorothy Height (Black Heritage series)
The 40th stamp in the Black Heritage series honors Dorothy Height (1912-2010), the tireless activist who dedicated her life to fighting for racial and gender equality. Although she rarely gained the recognition granted her male contemporaries, she became one of the most influential civil rights leaders of the 20th century. The stamp features artist Thomas Blackshear II’s gouache and acrylics on board portrait of Height. The painting is based on a 2009 photograph shot by Lateef Mangum. Art director Derry Noyes designed the stamp.

National Day of the Horse, December 13

United States 2-cent Post Horse and Rider stamp from 1869.
United States 2-cent Post Horse and Rider stamp from 1869.

Today, December 13, is the National Day of the Horse, a day annually observed in appreciation for the contribution of horses to the economy, history and character of the country. The domesticated horse we know today was first introduced into North America by Spanish explorers.

Escaped horses eventually spread across the American Great Plains and were later domesticated by the early settlers of the West. Horses played a significant role in postal history, delivering mail and messages for many years. In the early days of U.S. mail when there became a great demand for a more timely transportation of public correspondence, riders on horseback, known as “post riders,” would be contracted to take small bundles of mail and packages, first along post roads and later, through a series of relays, across the country.

Mail transported  by horse briefly reduced the time for mail to travel between the Atlantic and Pacific coasts to around 10 days before being replaced by the Transcontinental Railroad and then the telegraph.