Year of the Rooster Stamp Issue Date Announced

Year of the Rooster (Celebrating Lunar New Year series)
Year of the Rooster (Celebrating Lunar New Year series).

The United States Postal Service will issue the Year of the Rooster commemorative forever stamp January 5 nationwide. The first-day-of-issue ceremony will take place at 11:30 a.m. at the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, 719 S. King Street, Seattle, Washington.

Here is the USPS media advisory announcing the issue date for the stamp with additional information:

Postal Service to Celebrate 2017 Lunar New Year
Issuing Year of the Rooster Forever Stamp

What: The U.S. Postal Service rings in the Year of the Rooster by issuing the tenth of 12 stamps in the Celebrating Lunar New Year series. The Year of the Rooster begins on Jan. 28, 2017 and ends on Feb. 15, 2018.

Who: Greg G. Graves, vice president Area Operations – Western Area,
United States Postal Service
Yibo Lu, director, Chinese Radio Seattle’s CRS Office
Beth Takekawa, executive director, The Wing Luke Museum
Ron Chew, CEO, Chew Communications
Assunta Ng, founder and publisher, Seattle Chinese Post and Northwest Asian Weekly

When: Thursday, Jan. 5, 2017, 11:30 a.m.

Where: Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience, 719 S. King Street, Seattle, WA 98104

Background: The most important holiday of the year for many Asian communities around the world, the Lunar New Year is celebrated primarily by people of Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Tibetan and Mongolian heritage.

In the United States and elsewhere, the occasion is marked in various ways across many cultures; parades featuring enormous and vibrantly painted papier-mâché dragons, parties, and other special events are common. Vendors at outdoor markets sell flowers, toys, food, and other items for celebration. Musicians play drums to celebrate this time of renewed hope for the future.

Many families present red envelopes (hongbao), like the one depicted in the stamp art, containing money to children and loved ones.

Art director Ethel Kessler worked on the series with illustrator Kam Mak, a Hong Kong-born artist who grew up in New York City’s Chinatown and now lives in Brooklyn. The artwork focuses on some of the common ways the Lunar New Year holiday is celebrated. For the Year of the Rooster, the illustration —originally created using oil paints on panel — depicts a colorful rooster emblazoned on a red envelope (hongbao). Parents present red envelopes containing money to children and loved ones during Lunar New Year celebrations. The color red symbolizes luck in Chinese culture, while rooster imagery is often used to ward off evil spirits. The characters at the top of the envelope form a common Chinese greeting of celebration and wish for prosperity and good fortune, used most frequently during Lunar New Year.

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